Got Milk, Can Donate!




A few quick things to know about donating:

Milk for your family always comes first.


The milk bank will ask you repeatedly if you have enough saved for your own child(ren). Once milk is donated you cannot get it back. The milk bank and co-op will not accept layered milk. Milk must be pumped, bagged and frozen right away. Cleanliness of parts and hands is super important. They will reject your milk if it is contaminated.

Do you find yourself with a freezer full of breast milk and don’t know what to do with it?

There are several options for donating your extra frozen milk. Below are the pros, cons and specifics of each type of donating in the Southeastern Pennsylvania area. This information was compiled by an experienced nursing mom who has direct experience with each of these methods. We hope this information is helpful to you.



1. Mother’s Milk Bank Northeast (Milk Bank of Boston)

Phone number is 617.527.6263.(Extension #3 to donate)
http://milkbankne.org/


*The website is very helpful for any information.*


• Strict guidelines are used since the milk is going to very sick or premature babies in the hospital.

• Multiple banks in the United States (the 2 closest are Ohio & Boston) Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA)-- www.hmbana.org

• Require a minimum of 175 oz. You do not have to donate this all at one time, however they do request a minimum of 50 oz per shipment (as the cost of shipping milk is very high).

• 3 step process: phone interview, screening paperwork, and blood test

• Blood Test: This is the easiest part. You take it to a lab (Quest DOES NOT do these) or hospital to have your blood drawn. Most places will then pack it and then ship it for you.

• Once you have a passed all of these steps, a cooler will be shipped to you and you are ready to donate!

• Pros/Cons: It is totally confidential, however you never know who will get your milk. Easiest ways to donate (very little effort on your part, i.e. don’t need to find recipients)



2. Eats on Feets

http://www.eatsonfeets.org/

• Eats on Feets is a community based breast milk sharing network. This is a very casual sharing process, where a lot of trust is placed on both donor and receiver.

• There are no guidelines other than you are not allowed to ask for money in exchange for breast milk. In some instances where donors travel a great distance, they may ask for gas cards to help relieve some of that cost. In most cases, the person donating the milk gets milk bags replaced and the feeling of helping another family/child.

• Most recipients have questions for the donor; meds you take, drug/alcohol use, diet, blood test

• This type of donating is different because you are using Facebook to find either families in need of milk or you are posting that you have milk to donate and they will find you (and they will).

• Reason people request milk (medical, never get milk, can’t produce enough, child can’t/doesn’t latch, adoption)

• Meet in/near a public place. DO NOT bring your child and only donate a small amount or only meet to talk first. You can even talk on the phone first.

• A few things to think about when donating: Do I want a local family, someone close to my work or home that I will make it easier to donate, Do I only want to donate to babies of a certain age range, Do they smoke or does someone in the family smoke?

• Pros/Cons: You know who you are donating to, you can form connections and friendships. It takes a lot more work to screen the donors. Finding them or them finding you is the easy part.



3. Private Donation

• Sharing with friends/family

• No guidelines

• Human Milk 4 Human Babies (Informed MilkSharing Network) -- http://hm4hb.net/



4. Mother’s Milk Co-Op

http://www.mothersmilk.coop/

    1 (888) 250-8738

*The website is very helpful for any information.*

• Strict guidelines are used - same as when using the milk bank.

• You either donate milk or get “milk money”.

• If you do “milk money”, your first 100oz are “donated” to cover expenses such as your blood test. Require a minimum of 300 oz, per shipment (as the cost of shipping milk is very high).

• 3 step process: online application, screening paperwork (via email), and blood test

• Blood Test: This is the easiest part. You take it to a LabCorp Lab ONLY (they will not cover other labs, unless you contact them because none are local. LabCorp will then pack it BUT NOT ship it for you. Plus, you have wait an hour between draw and ship time.

• Once you have a passed all of these steps, you can request a cooler shipment and you are ready to donate!







Updated July 2014